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. maybe when we saw something at the mailbox in east texas and turned out to be someone's science project we thought it was a bomb. we scrolled, you know, actually after the world trade center and the pentagon maybe some neighborhood in texas was not going the target. and even if you are saying, you know, there's better safe than sorry. maybe the police did not -- to take after they figured out it was a school project. that's the kind of paranoia i like to spend time discussing in the book. it's easy to say look it's the great people. who believe in conspiracy theory. there are crazy folks in the book. but all sorts of every day people, people that watch c-span, people that, you know, can get seized by it at different time. we later realize that it was a little bit over the top. >> with the revelation about the nsa, the irs, in your view, should we be paranoid? >> i never want encourage to be paranoid. it's good to be scect -- i'm for good solid investigative journalism. >> what is one of your favorite conspiracists or leaders from our history? >> from our history. well, some of the inter
in a mailbox in east texas and this is a true story that turned out to be a science project, but we thought it was a bomb. after the world trade center and the pentagon, may be said would not be the preferred target. even if you say it's better safe than sorry, maybe the police did not meet after they figured out it was a project to confiscate it just in case. that's the kind of paranoia that to spend time discussing in the book because it is some name that's easy to say that the crazy people who believe in conspiracy theories. there are some crazies in not book. all stories of everyday people who watch c-span. people can get different times and made her realize it was a little bit over the top. >> host: with the revelations about the nsa, irs come in your view should we be paranoid? >> guest: i never want to encourage people to be paranoid because that's a clinical term. it is certainly good to be skeptical and suspicious a lot of the time. i am all for good, solid investigative journalism is grounded in facts and evidence. >> host: jesse walker, who was one of your favorite conspiracies o
the numbers, that kind of discretion was gone. he came from texas, a registered republican, which a lot of people find surprising given what he did. his dad was a police officer. he was an outsider in terms of the police department culture. he didn't grow up in bay ridge or jamaica or south bronx. he was on the outside. he didn't have any ties here. he didn't want to be a police officer. he had been in the navy as a coreman, got out, and worked for motorolla on software chips and only moved back to new york because his mother got sick. she was very sick. she said to him -- there was an ad for police department for police recruiting ad after 9/11 said try to be a police officer. he said, oh, i don't want to do that. she finally convinced him, and he took the test, did very well, they called him immediately, and he found himself standing there in the police academy, and for the first couple years, he went along with the program. the first thing you do as a police officer is go to impact where you are sent to a high crime precinct as a rookie, and for eight months, told to write tickets. y
in dc, and i think all the perspectives, i hope, enrich the readers here in north texas. i mean, that's how i see it. it's -- one thing i promised parents was i would never cover drug trafficking. we lived on the border in el paso, and that was something you knew not to touch or mess around with because it could come back and bite you. by the early -- after the president and george w. bush relationship, after 9/11, the immigration policy was not going anywhere. i decided best thing for me was to get back to mention -- mexico. there was industry changes. the economic crisis affected us, and i was basically had no other choice other than cover drug trafficking because it was the big story. it's, i think, like many mexicans, i had tried to look away or not really -- not really look at the monster, you know, face-to-face. after that incident, after that, i covered various stories and saw how deep the penetration was. from that point on, i mean, i didn't look back. it is a personal story. it's a personal memoir and gorpny, but i hope that enriches the reader in many ways. >> ambassador, ho
of texas where i give my ph.d. in philosophy and went to the jobs bulletin board and the only thing that there was a notice from the department of labour about minimum wage and what you are entitled to. it didn't look so promising not there. so i saw a student walked by and i said how are you doing and they said fine. i did my ph.d. here? they said how is it working out? i have a radio show. i said that's good on that dialogue i hope this. anyway, we talk a lot about the jobs in the book because they are the jobs that are very much worth at and they are the course of study at least at the present is quite worth that. we based some of the conclusions we came up with in the book on the return on investment findings on the pay scale from the year 2012 to 2013 the numbers are up, too and this has shown that this pattern continues. the top ten institutions giving you a return on investment are all technical institutions or institutions that emphasize or have a very strong presence in science technology engineering and math. i mentioned the colorado school of mind at the tent is stamford
at an arsenal in pennsylvania. al or hunter left her position as a domestic in texas and security job into california plant. in chicago, fannie curry and hattie alexander went to work for the illinois central railroad. they shuttle's cinders and slung pits. eddie murphy phillips was a journalist working for the family newspaper, the baltimore afro-american. she became the first female oversees war correspondent when she traveled to europe in 1844. after getting sick she reported from her hospital bed as black soldiers came to her bedside to tell their stories. will the brown held the commercial pilot license and a -- certificacertifica te. can you imagine how unusual that was in the late 30s? she taught aviation classes for the new deals wpa the works progress of bennister asian with her husband willa established the school of aeronautics and she can't go. at the school they trained pilots, the school was open to men of any race and men who completed training could take the exam and qualify for training with the u.s. army air forces. even some of the instructors have been trained at w
consider quÉbec team texas law. instead of bureaucrats who say to change your doing this, they send us what team to scare everyone. we now see s.w.a.t raid. i read about this in the nicest part of virginia. it was done under alcohol inspection. i said someone along and this was actually a drug investigation, but they didn't have enough evidence to get a search warrant for the sunset debris that somebody from the regulatory agency evinces and alcohol spec should even that they are prepared to s.w.a.t team to enforce it. the guy who owned the bar brought a federal lawsuit in federal court of appeals said there's nothing that reasonable about running a s.w.a.t team to enforce regulatory the college is also terrified. and within the outcome of florida, the police suspected drug activity going on a barber shops. they didn't have enough evidence to get a search warrant on the civic audit state occupational licensing board who sent an inspector industry licensure inspections to make sure propers were properly licensed to cut hair. there were 37 or 47 and all but three were arrested for bribery wit
or california or texas by a landslide margins. the number of counties that switched from one party to the next in this was about the lowest ever. it was 207 counties. this is a red and blue country and in the end it's like despite everything else or along with everything else people sorted themselves out in the end rather blue. if people set identify with her papa can party 90 to 95% would vote republican in and the same with the democrats. that has become one of the most significant aspects of our politics. the fourth if you are thinking outside the fourth grade force that was crucially important and was a demographic changes that we have seen over the last several decades. each presidential campaign by presidential campaign the electorate becomes less white in its composition. his still predominantly white but it goes down a couple of percentage points with each election. it was 74% white in 2008 which was the lowest it has ever been here day went to chicago back in the spring of the election-year and sat down with jim messina the campaign manager and i was interested in exploring this pheno
am from howard payne university in texas. and my economic development costs, we read a book about western imperialism and how the u.s. and great britain kind of imposed the western views on other countries. and it talks about state-owned enterprises and how those can be beneficial in some cases. in your opinion is there ever a time if they don't have a price can be beneficial, you know, at least to get it started and is it ever possible that the private owned. is it ever a good thing, or is it always like this. tonight that's an excellent question. >> a couple of years on earth day is coming a lot of trouble. the u.s. postal service has basically delivered. in order to keep 300,000 trucks delivering these things can take it to a landfill. this is the area that i study my research relationship. for the government to be a primary customer in the industry, it is devised for the postal system. the transcontinental railroad is an example. and the internet was handed over to the public. so there are times that i believe the government has a legitimate role. but no, i don't think that th
, was compelled to hire rudy black, a 5 the kappa graduate of the university of texas, black, who started her own news bureau in washington and had a hard time hunting up plans found eleanor a welcome change from her first lady predecessor, lou henry hoover. mrs. hoover had stayed so far away from the fresh that black had been forced to bribe a male colleague to reveal details of mrs. hoover's daily schedule so black could write an article for women's magazine. doug mitchell colleague who was brought and had to snoop around a secret servicemen and report back to black, similarly thurmond reported to dressing up in a single girl scout uniform and sneaking into the white house to cover a christmas party that mrs. hoover gave for a scout troop. you can see that the idea of the lenore meeting openly with women journalists was very welcome to a good number of washington women. with the greatest of pleasure thurmond and black were among the 35 who gathered for a lenore's press conference on march 6, 1933. they had a nervous first lady who knew the white house staff was very undignified to meet with the
might as well kept me hitched in the plantations of east texas. she wanted a home, nothing fancy, and a civilized city, a house up the road in fresno or bakersfield would do, but willie patterson, her husband, kept pounding nails and boards on to that crooked hut in the middle of horn toad country, and the black people kept trickling in from oklahoma, arkansas, texas, and louisiana. they'd come looking for a place with a cotton growing a little taller and the white folks had. raised up a little nicer. they found the taller cotton. i'm not sure they found the white folks any nicer. the black oakees thought coming west they'd leave behind the racism. the sunshined more benignly on them here, but i remember a number of them telling me it was a more cruel kind of racism, smile on the face, but a dagger behind the back is how they described california. they were not allowed to live in any of the cities, not even the small towns. they were locked out. the only land available for them were these patches of ailing land. when you see the land, it's so salty, it's like it snowed there. it
are from kentucky, utah, texas, generally the most conservative senators are conservative states and the most conservative congressmen are from rural districts. i think realistically if the republican party is going to be a more limited government party as we're talking about, you're going to start having more senators from purple states and congressmen from suburban districts that are elected and limited government candidates. but typically in these more urban or suburban districts or purple states you're not going to have the more conservative candidates winning in primaries. so i'm just concerned how realistic is that to expect the party to truly be taken over by more limited government candidates? >> sure. that definitely is a major challenge because what we've seen really since the rise of the conservative movement with the founding of national review in 1955 and some events before that, we've really only had two movement conservatives nominated for president by the republican party. we had barry goldwater in 1964 who went on to lose and then ronald reagan who went on to win
. the iranians showed a very sophisticated production themselves. a professor from the university of texas in austin showed was a thousand dollars worth of equipment that he and his students to work on to hack into a drone and then there is the cost in terms of anti-american sentiment. it is a real cost. if you look at pakistan, three out of four pakistanis in the poll say they consider the united states an enemy and when the prime minister was asked why so many take this as way in the united states and she had an answer, which is drones. it is part of a u.s. base but they were using in the cost of that has been over a billion dollars and that should be considered a cost as well. there are all kinds of ways to look at the cost. then i would say that one way is perhaps the biggest cost of all, not at the cost of not searching for nonmilitary alternatives. here we have on one hand the boots on the ground, where u.s. soldiers get killed. then you have the alternative. that is the drones. now cyberwarfare and special operations as well. those keep us looking at the third alternative, which is
texas. she wanted a home, nothing fancy in a civilized city in fresno or bakersfield would do. but willie patterson and her husband kept pounding nails and boards onto that crooked hut in the middle of horned toad country and the black people kept trickling from oklahoma and arkansas and texas and louisiana. they had come looking for a place with the cotton grew a little taller in the white folks have been raised that the little nicer. they found the taller cotton. i'm not sure they sound away folks any nicer. >> the black okies thought coming wednesday with the behind the racism. the sun did shine a little bit more benignly here. but i remember a number of them telling me it was even a more cruel kind of racism. a smile on the face with a dagger behind the back is how they describe california. they were not allowed to live in any of the cities, not even the small towns. and so the only land available for them with these patches of alkali land. literally, right upon the land you look at it. it is so salty. it looks as if it snowed there. this was land available to them. they b
kappa graduate of the university of texas. lacked, start her own news bureau in washington and had a hard time hunting of clients found eleanor a welcome change from her first lady predecessor, lou henry hoover. mrs. hoover had state so far away from the press that black had been forced to bribe a male colleague to reveal some details of mrs. hoover's daily schedule so blac black could write an are for women's magazine. and the male colleague who's bribed and had to snoop around among the secret service men and report back to black. similarly, firm and had to resort to dressing up in a girl scout uniform and sneaking into the white house. to cover a christmas party that mrs. hoover gave for a scout troop. you can see that the idea of eleanor meeting openly with women journalists was very welcome to a good number of these washington women. .. as what goes on politically in the legislative national life and also what the social and personal life is at the white house. now, it must have been so gratifying for these women who were paid less than male journalists and generally looked do
the south as far west as texas. in 1680, nathaniel sylvester in english and brought up in amsterdam and his english wife counted 24 people as their property. the largest number in the north of the time, 11 men and women and 13 children. many have african names and others had creel names such as chiuaro that tells you they had come from other places besides africa. the and then transported to the west indies or to brazil to where this could be a man of french origin, the ending tells you it probably has a hispanic connotation. conjure with it as you like to read. the labor produced the first well for the sylvester's from the west indies sugar trade. on shelter island they tended hogs and cattle. the bride and a broken horses to power the sugar mills and cut tree is to shape to make tasks which were really the shopping bags of the day. you couldn't do anything with sugar unless you had a barrel to put it in. you couldn't do anything with rahm allows you have a barrel to put it in or anything with molasses unless you had a barrel to put it in. the staves that were cut here were shut down, whic
as texas. in 1680 nathaniel sylvester in english man brought up in amsterdam and his english wife counted 24 people as their property, the largest number in the north at that time, 11 men and women and 13 children. many african names and others had creel names such as chiquero that tells you they had come from other places besides africa. they had been transported the west indies or to brazil chiquero could be name of french origin, jaque tells you it may have a spanish connotation. call it what you will. that's chiquero. the slave labor produced the first well for the sylvester's from the west indian sugar trade. on the shelter island the tended hogs and cattle to butcher for salt and meat. the bread and pro courses to power the sugar mills and cut trees to shape to make tasks which were really the shopping bags of the day. you couldn't do anything with sugar unless you had a barrel to put it. you couldn't do anything with rahm unless you had a barrel to put it. you couldn't do anything with molasses unless you had a barrel to put it. the staves that were cut here were shaken down which
. not to forget the court this past term also decided an affirmative action case from the university of texas, in which affirmative action survived by a hair. i am persuaded that by that the decision the supreme court is setting up the law to strike down racial diversity as a compelling justification for race conscious affirmative action programs. but taken together i think we can say three things about each of those events or images, each of which offers us an approach on to the state of black politics in the united states today. about that supreme court decision in his opinion for the court, the chief justice, justice roberts says it's something that i do not think could have been set 50 years ago and would not have been set 50 years ago by a member of the u.s. supreme court. there is a moment in the opinion in which he frankly admits that racial discrimination in american life, particularly here in the voting excess and goes on to say no one denies that. yet by the end of the opinion, what he has given us is a legal judgment, the reading of the constitution, which effectively says racial d
a case in texas it's almost certainly in the mistake in execution. opponents of capital punishment are often challenged, you know, find us a real case. find us a truly innocent person who was executed. it's probably -- the case in texas is probably it. a case of eye witness testimony gone wrong. it it's a case of people being in the wrong place at the wrong time. when you look at the man who was executed and the man who was now presumed guilty of the crime side by side in photographs so you a hard time telling the difference. our book doesn't take aned a have -- advocacy position. it's not a book for or against capital punishment. the goal of the book is to show you the question. we come to the conclusion how the system doesn't work, but we're not here to tell you whether or not capital punishment is right or wrong. >> guest: young the risk of executing the innocent has drawn strange reaction from some of the justices. see, look, be good -- it might help your cause if you point one. we can assume -- looking at the statistics and even then no one ever said the system is perfect. are
and a gentleman from texas and his committee have presented a bill calling for a centenary monetary commission to examine what should be the american monetary standard. an examination of history and empirical evidence. especially historical evidence. and what all of those of different persuasions and there are many more in the taxonomy of the economists. but to bring forth his opinions in an attempt to gain a consensus and thereby to perhaps then it will do its duty and had a certain weight of precious metal. i thank you very much. thank you. [applause] >> in a moment i will invite you to lunch. it will be held on the second level in the conference center. the school up the spiral staircase. you cannot find it, this gentleman right here will help you. on behalf of a core financial, i would like to thank you for inviting me to come and help us on this book. i would also like to thank the cato institute for hosting this event and allowing me to take part. it's such an important piece of work to all of us. i really hope that it will serve its purpose and reignite the debate over the classic stand
a powerful man. william henry harrison also said he was willing to an ex texas of the southerners wanted to add to the union as a slave state and then he promptly died. officially the cause of death was pneumonia but others thought arsenic was to blame but nine years later president taylor was killed by the same poison in when president-elect james buchanan merely survived one of the most elaborate assassination plots ever conceived. february 23rd, 1857, seven agents point all the bulls of the world sugar at the hotel he said seveners drink coffee so they would be scared in the northern diners would be wiped out including buchanan. he very -- pretty survived. intimidated buchanan wrote more than ever the tool of the slave power. there is little evidence the you could make a case in more than what was killed him. when the body was exhumed in 1991 buchanan was not even present on february 23rd but dysentery did break out and buchanan stayed there one month early when he returned for his inauguration. today it is attributed to this to wage back up but at the time several stories circulated
as texas. in 1680 nathaniel sylvester, an englishman brought up in amsterdam, and his english wife counted 24 people as their property, the largest number in the north at the time, 11 men and women and 13 be children. many had african names. others had creole names which tells you that they had come through other places besides africa. they had, they'd been transported to the west indies or to brazil. it could be a name of french origins, jacques, the o ending tells you it probably has some hispanic other connotation. conjure with it as you like, that's jacquero. the slave labor produced the first town of wealth for the sylvesters from the sugar trade. on shelter island they tended hogs and cattle to butcher for salt meat, they bred and broke horses to power the sugar mills and cut trees to make casks which were really the shopping bags of the day. you couldn't do anything with sugar unless you had a barrel to put it in. you couldn't do anything with rum unless you had a barrel to put it in. you couldn't do anything with molasses unless you had a barrel to put it in. the staves that were c
to west texas, arizona in the 1940s, parts of new mexico, the arid west, these are dry parts of america, these can be irrigated, roosevelt really did believe parts of the united states could be a model for the middle east. and whether he is meeting with the shah of iran in december of 43 or king farouk in february '45, he is constantly bringing of four stations. how many trees he planted estimate how many plant in his life, he flew over the middle east when he was leaving the tehran conference, he was surprised power era the middle east was. everyone should be involved in a big civilian conservation corps campaign to plant trees in the middle east to get their topsoil rooted and -- some of these arab leaders, he ruled over 1 paved road, so talk to him about these massive infrastructure projects, the american said we can bring a new deal to the middle east, we can develop the middle east, this will be part of the plan of reciprocity. here is where they ran into a big problem. the american critique, the british had sided with most of the regionales, they failed to distinguish between the
of texas in which affirmative action survived by a hair. i am persuaded that in that decision the supreme court is setting up the law to strike down racial diversity as a compelling justification for race conscious affirmative action programs. taken together weakens a three things about each of those events or images, each of which offers us a perch on to the state of black politics in the united states today. about that supreme court decision, in his opinion for the courts the chief justice, justice roberts, says something that i do not think could have been said hist 50 years ago, would not have been sent 50 years ago by a member of the u.s. supreme court. there's a moment in the opinion in which he frankly admits that racial discrimination in american life, a particularly here in voting, exists, goes on to say no one denies that and yet by the end of the opinion what he has given us is a reading of the constitution which effectively says racial discrimination exists, no one denies it and we don't care. so we are living in peculiar moment at which at one of the same time, we can admit t
, utah, texas. generally the most conservative senators are from conservative states and the most conservative congress -- congressman are from rural districts. realistically the republican party will be senators from purple states and congressman from suburban districts that are elected in a limited government candid it. typically in these more urban or suburban districts, purple states, you won't have a conservative candid it's winning primaries. how realistic is that to expect a party to truly be taken over by more limited government candid it's? >> sure. that definitely is a major challenge because we have seen really since the rise of the conservative movement with the founding of the national review in 1955 and some events before, we have really only had two movement conservatives nominated for president by the republican party with mary goldwater in 1964 went on to lose and then ronald reagan who went to terms. george w. bush, i have a lot of criticisms of him in my book, was summoned it was influenced by the conservative movement and had conservatives in his administration
and steel industries had rained prosperity on texas. an out of work auto executive drove to houston every weekend and filled his trunk with sunday papers. back in detroit he resold the want ads to union men. stanley took $6.50 an hour to stand on a wobbly scaffold with a bunch of illegal aliens. after houston he tried california, enrolling in a bartending school. when the classes ended his instructor told him, i think you'd be better off looking on your own. so rob stanley, a steel worker who hadn't made steel for over three years, wandered back home to the east side more no other reason than it was spring, and softball was about to start. on a 36 -- as a 36-year-old bachelor, unemployment didn't bother him that much. if his car wasn't running, one of his teammates would always drive him to a game, and eventually he found a new job as a plumber for the federal government, but he really had to start his whole retirement savings over again at age 40. so it's taking him a lot longer to retire than he expected originally. so the last excerpt i'll read a is about what happens to a city after i
committee of congress distinguished gentleman from texas, kevin brady, and his committee have presented a bill calling for a monetary commission to exam what should be the american monetary standard and examination of history, an examination of the empire call evidence, especially the historical evidence, and what all of those different persuasions, monitorrists, classists, i guess there are many of them. there's many more in the tax on my of economists. to bring forth the opinion and and tempt to get a consensus and there by to go to congress and perhaps then it will do its duty and establish the american monetary system and define it as it was in 1892, at the beginning of the american republican as a certain weight of pressure metal. thank you very, very much. [applause] >> in a moment i will invite you to rise and join us for lunch. lunch is held on the second level, and the george conference center. up the spiral staircase. if you can't find, this gentleman will help you. on behalf of gordon financial, i would like to thank you for inviting me to help present your book. "money, gold
to state university like austin, texas, or michigan. that's bumping down kids who are normally going those schools to second-tier school. you have a trickle down in college as well. as private school becomes too companyive. and the worst case scenario. everybody is fearing that i'll get really sick because i'm uninsured or underinsured. even if you have, you know, an hmo at the time. 209% you have to kick in will wreck me financially. so we're up to the 1990s. there's very little cause to be optimistic at the point. we have george bush i. basically picks up are reagan left it. we have a recession in the early '90s. a lot are paying off the debt we accumulate in thed 1980 because we spent so much money. that's not good either. we have a new threat. outsourcing in a big way. at love jobs are going overseas. more bad news. the media focus on what they call the downsize middle class white worker. the worker is angry that protected minority are getting preferential treatment. .. even if you are not poor unemployed work the barely making ends meet if you aren't a lower class in the middle 90s. i
baltimore all the way down to around florida, down along the gulf coast, to the end of texas that would be a foreign territory. it would not be part of the united states. in fact, the united states would have no real access to either the atlantic or the caribbean, except for a narrow path from baltimore north as far as boston. that is not a very good water anyway. all the sudden the great atlantic coast of the united states is narrowed to a point where it can easily blockaded. everything has to be funneled through there. it doesn't mean the united states collapse under the own weight. it means the united states would no longer have anywhere near the presence in the western hemisphere in term of dealing british intervention or french intervention. i remind my readers in 18 5eu6r, the french had troops technically it was the max in mexico and my theory is that had the south won the civil war, the french would stayed in mexico, and the british would expanded their influence around the caribbean, and what became for the last half of the 19th and 20th century the caribbean as american leg do
rationalize this conversation away harriet and sam say are exactly right and reinforce stereotypes and texas farther away from the hope that we can do anything about it because it reinforces these cultural stereotypes. >> is there anyone in the audience who would like to ask one of the panelists a question? don't be shy. can we get a microphone? can you step up to the microphone? thank you. >> good afternoon. it is more of the piggybacking mentioned in reference to until we acknowledge the racism, until we acknowledge the attack on the african-american male, you won't be able to resolve it. when are we going to address it? anyone on the panel. >> anyone want to tackle that? >> i wish i knew. i agree with you. >> the collaboration you mentioned in boston where the church, board of education and everyone came together and mobilize that is the start because my question initially would be how to go back to my community in connecticut and implements something to make a difference to help our youth? known nothing else, vacation bible school this week for ninth grade to twelfth grade and the main t
, except so far new york, boston, texas looks likely. displs we've been talking with francis spufford here in london, author of "unapologetic," "red plenty," and several other books. thank you for spending a little time with us here on booktv. >> guest: you're very welcome. >> this is introduction of my own story, this wonderful frnd of my, anita rachavan, and i met her back in 1995. i came to new york, and i was looking for stories to do, and i decided to do a story on indian journalist who were rising in the main steam business press, and at that time when i interviewed the people who reached the top position, someone said, hey, you know, this reporter you must meet at the "wall street journal," anita rachavan, and he described her as the bright kid going places. at that time, she was reporting on the securities industries, securities industry, and, well, she did go places because i met her again in, you know, just a couple years ago when she was appointed as the london bureau chief, and now with this book, i assure you that anita will go further still. >> i was fascinating by a street f
with david lesch. he is a professor of middle east studies and history at t the university in texas, and he's been going to syria for, i believe, 23 years? >> what's 1989? 2323 -- twenty-three years, yes. >> the reason i'm excited to have him talk to us tonight, unlike a lot of people who have lots of opinions about syria, david got to know bashar al-assad, which is unique, and after his father died, and now discovered that not to be the case, and there's another book called # "the fall of the house of assad" trying to fill us in. we'll talk about that tonight, and my first question is going to be simply, when did you first meet assad, and what were your impressions of him? >> i first met president assad in 2004. i wanted to interview him because he was the a-typical middle east dictator. he was a libsed ophthalmologist, not groomed to be president, and he was only brought back into the political apparatus when his older brother died in a car? 1994. he was in london getting an advanced degree in on the molg, and he was brought back and raised in the state apparatus until he became president
to austin, texas to see the glorious once in papers. i teach ph.d. students. appro with the only historian has made the trip to austin texas, which says these great archives, including the lbj library, to let the glorious slauson papers, and then then i found her handwritten notes that she gave whoever wrote her autobiography -- the autobiography had none of this. red without much participation from her. remember when will the chamberlain or charles barkley or someone was asked -- was a barkley? what is this doing? he said to i don't know. i haven't ready yet. gloria swanson in these handwritten notes said the she tried during and after her affair with joe to figure out how this devout catholic who went to confession in mass kitschy of his life. she said -- and loyal as communal, had her own prejudices she didn't like she's very much. she said it was because confession was like washing his sense. he would go to confession, washes hands : all over again the next day. this is part of the story after tell. yes, sir. over here. >> would you elaborate a little more of what you -- i think you sa
daily briefing to george bush in crawford, texas. one month before 9/11. what does it say? that was intelligence that was important enough to share with the president of the united states two years later. that was gotten by gregory scarpa, jr. for the fbi. linda and scarpa at that point in 1996 it was a huge problem in the southern district of new york and broob lynn. remember i told you about the colombo war. fourteen guys and the guy shot through the glass in the window. hank? well, they are now 75 cases percolating through the court in the colombo war. these are all the wise guys. in the original cases nobody knew that carr pa had a secret relationship with the bureau. the defense attorney never knew. linda was testifying as an experience. nobody had an idea he was in a quote holy alliance. that's what they call the material. so you a right as a criminal defendant whether you're in the mob or not. they freaking out. a memo was sent in '96. they start doing in march of '96. here a memo in 1996. the new york office who became -- and dlain is undergoing an internal affair
that but the point is it is important. not only does it separate the confederacy into. suddenly texas, arkansas louisiana is cut away. you can't get there anymore. so all their supplies, all the food and all the manpower is coming from the mississippi through the confederacy coming eastbound. it doesn't happen anymore. they can't cross the river. big union controls the river. the other thing is vicksburg is a rail hub. the railroad coming from the east stops at the river in vicksburg and from there it points west -- from points west that stops. now the union army controls the railroad and they cut it off. you can't underestimate the power of rivers and roberts during the civil war. they didn't have interstate highways. they didn't have trucks. these rivers and railroads and the union army by capturing vicksburg stops all of that and the whole part of the country. the other part of this is now the mississippi river is wide open for the union army to use and the union navy to use to transport material meant food equipment, so whatever they need and to the south trade it very definitely is the beg
] >> [inaudible] a friend in texas who was a part of the school children were attending. a teacher wanted to bring in a woman dressed in a burqa to teach the koran. and i'm mentioning this so we can address our members of congress because i thought it was a great approach, she said okay, if they come in and they want to teach the koran, and i want to come in. i have a jewish friend and i'm a christian and we want to coming and teach the bible and teach about the prayers. can't do that. why not? with freedom of religion. if you're going to do what you must allow for us to come in and do the same. >> i think that's a great point. i think this is, man, i have reported on this around the country, textbooks in this country from public schools textbooks, you would be alarm by some of things being talked about israel, about islam from the history of islam. give you an example, a book called the arab studies notebook public, reported on it a few years ago. it was thankfully pulled from public schools, but it taught that muslims accompanied columbus to america and helped discover america. and this public s
kentucky utah and texas generally the most conservative senators are from rural districts. realistic -- realistically if they party you will have to have more senators from purple states and congressman from suburban districts that are elected and a limited government candidates. typically in these more urban or suburban districts or purple states who are not going to have the more conservative candidates winning in primary so i'm concerned how realistic is that to expect the party to be truly taking over by limited government candidates? >> that definitely is a major challenge because what we have seen really since the rise of the conservative movement, we have really only had to movement conservatives nominated for president by the republican party with barry goldwater in 1964 who went on to lose in ronald reagan who won two terms. george w. bush who i have a lot of criticisms of him and mike book was definitely somewhat influenced by the conservative movement and had some movement conservatives in his administration as his father did that he was not really himself a philosophicall
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